Practicing against chop

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vineRipeTomatoes
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Joined: 06/28/2011

Hi Larry. Would practicing looping against a chopper also improve ability to make opening loops against non choppers off of pushes, or are they different skills?

Larry Hodges
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Re: Practicing against chop

I have a question about chops coming to my backhand that hit the middle of the table and might go past the end line.  If the chop is going to the backhand and it looks like it will double bounce, how can you start low enough to turn the ball over with topspin.  It seems that I will try to hit the ball around 11:00 and they still go into the net.  I'm using Tenergy 05FX on both backhand and forehand on a OFF blade.

If the ball is going to double-bounce, then you have to contact it over the table, and so normally won't be able to loop it. (If the second bounce would be very near the endline and it's not too much backspin, then you can go over the table some to loop it.) If it's going to double bounce, you can flip or push it. 

Toxicspin 2nd a...
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Joined: 06/27/2011
Re: Practicing against chop

I have a question about chops coming to my backhand that hit the middle of the table and might go past the end line.  If the chop is going to the backhand and it looks like it will double bounce, how can you start low enough to turn the ball over with topspin.  It seems that I will try to hit the ball around 11:00 and they still go into the net.  I'm using Tenergy 05FX on both backhand and forehand on a OFF blade.

Larry Hodges
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Re: Practicing against chop

Related question: should you always try to loop against chop with the forehand? I noticed that Schlager, in his world championship final match against Joo, often decided to loop with his backhand as a variation.

Against a chopper, you should usually use your forehand loop. However, if you have a decent backhand loop (or a great one like Schlager), you should mix that in, mostly on the first shot, as a variation to mess up the opponent. It's a very common strategy - it's hard enough for the poor chopper to adjust to your forehand loop, but now he has to adjust to your backhand loop as well, where the timing is often very different with a typcially shorter swing. 

vineRipeTomatoes
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Joined: 06/28/2011
Re: Practicing against chop

Thanks Larry. Related question: should you always try to loop against chop with the forehand? I noticed that Schlager, in his world championship final match against Joo, often decided to loop with his backhand as a variation.

Larry Hodges
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Joined: 11/19/2010
Re: Practicing against chop

Hi Larry. Would practicing looping against a chopper also improve ability to make opening loops against non choppers off of pushes, or are they different skills?

While the timing is a little different, they are mostly the same skill, and practicing against a chopper is a valuable way to develop your loop against backspin. At the Maryland Table Tennis Center, all four of the full-time coaches (myself, Cheng Yinghua, Jack Huang, Jeffrey Zeng Xun) have chopping blades, which we regularly bring out so students can practice their loop against backspin. (We also do it with multiball, but chopping forces the player to adjust to read the ball in live action.) I have two chopping blades - a hardbat and one with long pips. I generally use the hardbat for beginning to intermediate players (easier to read the spin), and the long pips against more advanced players.